Regulations and regulatory matters

Regulations and regulatory matters

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Pharmacy Regulations 2013
Terms of Service

The NHS (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 2013

These regulations came into effect on 1 April 2013, and replace the 2012 regulations.  They reflect the new NHS architecture, in which NHS England (the NHS Commissioning Board, NHSCB)  is responsible for maintaining pharmaceutical lists, and the Health and Wellbeing Boards (HWB) are responsible for developing and publishing the Pharmaceutical Needs Assessments, which are used in the determination of routine applications for new pharmacies.

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 2013

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 2012, which came into effect on 1 September 2012, incorporate the market entry provisions, rural dispensing regulations, the Terms of Service under the community pharmacy contractual framework and Fitness to Practise provisions for pharmacy contractors.  These regulations revoke the 2005 regulations and their amendments, but were superceded by the 2013 regulations.

The authoritative source is the www.legislation.gov.uk website. Whenever it is necessary to identify what the law requires, the original statutory instrument must be used, then check for subsequent amendment in any amending regulations.


Click on a heading below for more information.

Summary of the main amendments to the 2013 Regulations from 1 April 2014

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) (Amendments and Transitional Provision) Regulations 2014

On 01 April 2014, amendments to the 2013 Regulations came into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Unforeseen benefits applications

Regulation 18 of the 2013 Regulations – which relate to pharmaceutical list applications where the applicant is seeking to offer what were unforeseen benefits at the time the relevant PNA was produced is amended. The 2013 Regulations identify three desirable characteristics of such applications and the amendment means that NHS England needs only to have particular regard to the desirability of one of these three when considering whether or not to grant an unforeseen benefits application.

Relocation applications

Before when an applicant made an application under Regulation 24 (no significant change relocation applications) one of the requirements was for NHS England to positively need to satisfy itself that granting the application would not cause significant detriment to proper planning. This is amended  so that the requirement now is that NHS England is not of the opinion that granting the application would cause significant detriment to proper planning – a far easier requirement to satisfy.

Distance selling relocation applications

The threshold criteria for distance selling relocation application was amended so that, if the relocation is of distance selling premises (e.g. mail order, internet pharmacies), NHS England must be satisfied that the general conditions that apply for the granting of new distance selling premises applications also apply to the grant of applications for relocations of distance selling premises that do not result in significant change to pharmaceutical services provision locally (regulation 8(c)).

Change of ownership applications

The threshold for change of ownership applications are another type of “excepted application”, and regulation 9(b) amends the threshold criteria in regulation 26 of the 2013 Regulations for granting these applications (which may sometimes be combined with a relocation application) so that if the application relates to distance selling premises, the NHS England must be satisfied that the general conditions that apply to the grant of new distance selling premises applications also apply to the grant of change of ownership applications for distance selling premises.

The changes in regulation 8(c) and 9(b) are also reflected in a change to regulation 64 of the 2013 Regulations, which sets the conditions of entry in pharmaceutical lists for distance selling premises. The change is to make sure that, going forward, the specific conditions of entry that apply to distance selling premises apply to all distance selling premises, not simply those distance selling premises that have resulted from the grant of an application pursuant regulation 25 of the 2013 Regulations and the provisions that preceded it (regulation 15). It is possible, however, that prior to 1st April 2014, distance selling premises may have relocated, or been given permission to relocate, under the previous arrangements to the same site as a provider of primary medical services with a patient list. A transitional provision is included in these Regulations so that, if that has indeed happened, the term of service that would prevent the distance selling premises being on the same site as a provider of primary medical services with a patient list is disapplied (regulation 16).

Same or existing premises

Regulation 31 of the 2013 Regulations provides circumstances in which NHS England must refuse a market entry application – if the proposed premises were part of the same site as the premises of an existing provider of pharmaceutical services. This now applies to all types of pharmaceutical list applications.

Best estimate applications

Sometimes applications for new NHS chemist premises include a “best estimate” of where the new premises are to be located, rather than an exact location, and in some cases where an exact location is given, change of that exact location is permissible after the application has been granted.

Paragraphs 31 and 32 of Schedule 2 to the 2013 Regulations were amended to provide that, when an exact location, or a different exact location, is given after an application has been granted, that location also cannot be part of the same site as the premises of an existing provider of pharmaceutical services.

LPS designation

Regulation 32 of the 2013 Regulations is amended so that a designation of an area or premises under Part 13 of the Regulations – which is a potential preliminary for a tendering exercise for a contract to provide local pharmaceutical services – now acts as a ground for deferring all types of routine applications in the area, or for the premises, covered by the designation – not just some types of routine applications.

Market entry – fitness to practise

Market entry applications may be deferred or refused on some specified grounds relating to the fitness to practise of the potential provider of pharmaceutical services to be a provider of such services. Previously, the refusal and deferral provisions applied only to potential providers who were individuals or bodies corporate.

Now Regulations 33 and 34 of the 2013 Regulations mean that these refusal and deferral provisions now also apply to the partners in applications from partnerships.

Rural

Regulation 40 of the 2013 Regulations includes a rule requiring the refusal of applications for new pharmacies in certain rural areas for a period of five years, where dispensing services are provided in the relevant location by dispensing doctors, if an application for a pharmacy within 1.6 kilometres of the proposed new pharmacy has been refused in the previous five years.

It is amended to prevent a new five year period being triggered if it is satisfied that the pharmacy application was motivated wholly or partly by a desire for the application to be refused, thus triggering a five year bar on further applications.

Appliance contractors

Providers of pharmaceutical services that provide certain types of specialist appliances may provide telephone care lines for users of the appliances during their normal opening hours. Schedules 4 and 5 of the 2013 Regulations are amended to provide that those providers must ensure that, during out of hour periods, if advice is not available to those users via those telephone lines, contact details are given via those telephone lines for alternative sources of NHS advice.

Summary of the amendments to the 2013 Regulations - from 1 March 2015

  

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) (Amendments and Transitional Provision) Regulations 2015

On 01 March 2015, amendments to the 2013 Regulations came into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Distance selling pharmacies

NHS England holds lists, known as pharmaceutical lists, of approved providers of pharmaceutical services. These lists are kept by reference to local authority areas. An amendment is made to regulation 25 of the 2013 Regulations to make it clear that an applicant for new distance selling premises who is an existing pharmacy but who is seeking replacement premises in the same local authority area is subject to the requirements in respect of distance selling premises applications in regulation 25.

Local pharmaceutical services – designation

Under regulation 99 of the 2013 Regulations, NHS England may designate premises or a neighbourhood for the purpose of giving priority in that place to the development of schemes for the provision of local pharmaceutical services – a form of contractual arrangement for the provision of pharmaceutical services that is separate from the pharmaceutical list system.

Before NHS England was required to refuse pharmaceutical list applications that related to a neighbourhood or premises covered by such a designation. This is now amended so that NHS England may defer such an application.

Local pharmaceutical services – choice to be a “health service body”

A local pharmaceutical services contractor may choose to be a “health service body” and so for their contract to be an NHS contract – and if they do, they may also choose to cease to be such a body and so for their contract to cease to be an NHS contract. Where a local pharmaceutical services contractor does choose to no longer be a health service body, the amendments provide that all disputes relating to the period when their contract was an NHS contract are to be dealt with via the NHS dispute resolution procedure.

The exception is where a dispute was already the subject of legal proceedings before these Regulations came into force e.g. 1 March 2015, that dispute is to be determined in accordance with the relevant legislation as it applied at that time. Before these Regulations came into force, disputes under a local pharmaceutical services contract that was not an NHS contract, but which related to a time when the contact was an NHS contract, could only be dealt with via the NHS dispute resolution procedure (if they had not been referred to that procedure when the contract was an NHS contract) with the contractor’s consent.

Market entry – fitness to practise

Applicants for inclusion in a pharmaceutical list may be granted subject to a condition that relates to the applicant’s fitness to provide pharmaceutical services. If that condition is appealed by the applicant, and the appeal is lost, the application may lapse if a required notification is not given by the applicant. In cases where the applicant makes a subsequent pharmaceutical list application, the application procedures are amended so that the applicant must make reference in the new application to the earlier lapsed application.

The pharmaceutical list applications procedures are also amended so that in all cases where the applicant is seeking the listing of premises that are the same as, or in close proximity to, premises that are already listed, the applicant must explain why they believe the application should not be refused under regulation 31 of the 2013 Regulations, which prevents the granting of applications where the proposed and existing premises should be treated as the same site.

Terms of service – repeat dispensing

Pharmacy required to give appropriate advice about the benefits of repeat dispensing to specified categories of patients.

Terms of service – clinical audit

Pharmacy contractors required to undertake a clinical audit of their choice, and either a clinical or policy based audit as specified by NHS England (regulation 8).

Summary of the amendments to the 2013 Regulations - from 1 July 2015

The National Health Service (Amendments to Primary Care Terms of Service relating to the Electronic Prescription Service) Regulations 2015

On 01 July 2015, amendments to the 2013 Regulations came into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Controlled drugs dispensing via the Electronic Prescription Service (EPS)

Previously, pharmacy contractors and local pharmaceutical services contractors were only allowed to dispense electronic prescriptions for controlled drugs if these were received via EPS and related to drugs listed in Schedule 4 or 5 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.

Community pharmacy may now also dispense electronic prescriptions received via EPS for controlled drugs listed in Schedule 2 or 3 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.  However, the systems suppliers for prescribers and pharmacies will need to amend the IT systems to allow this to take place.

Summary of the amendments to the 2013 Regulations - from 1 April 2016

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) (Amendment) Regulations 2016

On 01 April 2016, amendments to the 2013 Regulations came into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Summary Care Record (SCR)

From 1 April 2016, the terms of service will require NHS pharmacists who have access to the SCR to access this if they consider, in their clinical judgment that it is in the best interests of the patient to do so.

If an NHS pharmacist does access the SCR then this must be in accordance with The NHS Care Record Guarantee guidance available here.

Summary of the amendments to the 2013 Regulations - from 1 July 2016

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) (Amendment) Regulations 2016

On 1 July 2016, amendments to the 2013 Regulations came into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Exemption from prescription charges – anti fraud measures 

On 1 July 2016, NHS pharmacists and pharmacy staff must inform persons presenting a prescription on which an exemption declaration has been made without producing evidence of entitlement to exemption (where evidence is required but not provided) that NHS checks are routinely undertaken to verify that persons are exempt from payment of NHS prescription charges as part of the relevant arrangements for preventing or detecting fraud or error.

PSNC have produced a Briefing which aims to remind community pharmacy teams that this change will be taking place and includes our key things to consider to make compliance with this new requirement of the Terms of Service a matter of routine.

Summary of the amendments to the 2013 Regulations - from 5 December 2016

 

The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical Services, Charges and Prescribing) (Amendment) Regulations 2016

On 5 December 2016, amendments to the 2013 Regulations come into effect. The full extent and nature of these amendments can be found here

Pharmacy consolidations (mergers)

NHS pharmacy businesses may apply to consolidate the services provided on two or more sites onto a single site. Such consolidations could require a change in the ownership of one of the businesses concerned. A process to facilitate such consolidations will be in place.

Applications to consolidate will be dealt with as “excepted applications” under the 2013 Regulations, which means in general terms they will not be assessed against the pharmaceutical needs assessment (PNA). Instead, consolidation applications will follow a simpler procedure, the key to which is whether or not a gap in pharmaceutical service provision would be created by the consolidation. Some provision is also made in respect of continuity of services – for example, if NHS England intends to commission from the applicant “enhanced services” (additional pharmaceutical services, such as minor ailments schemes, that are commissioned locally by NHS England) that have been provided at or from the closing premises, the applicant is required to provide undertakings to continue to provide those services following consolidation.

If NHS England is satisfied that the consolidation would create a gap in pharmaceutical services provision, it must refuse the application.

The opinion of the Health & Wellbeing Board (HWB) on whether or not a gap in pharmaceutical service provision would be created by the consolidation must be given when the application is notified locally and representations sought. If the application is granted and pharmacy premises are removed from the relevant pharmaceutical list, if the HWB does not consider that a gap in service provision is created as a consequence, it must publish a supplementary statement published alongside its PNA recording its view.

If NHS England grants the application, it must then refuse any further “unforeseen benefits applications” seeking inclusion in the pharmaceutical list, if the applicant is seeking to rely on the consolidation as a reason for saying there is now a gap in provision, at least until the next revision of the PNA.

Supplementary prescribers

There are provisions for the prescribing and dispensing, as part of NHS primary care services of prescriptions written by therapeutic radiographer independent prescribers and dietitians who are entitled to prescribe as supplementary prescribers. These changes allow pharmacy contractors to dispense against NHS prescriptions issued by these new types of prescriber.

Emergency supply and the NHS prescription charge

NHS pharmacy contractors and LPS contractors who undertake emergency supplies of medicines at the request of a patient in accordance with the Urgent Medicine Supply Service are permitted to charge the NHS prescription charge.

The terms of service

NHS pharmacy contractors who have such emergency supply arrangements are not obliged to publicise them as part of their clinical governance programme. Clinical governance programmes are not generally required terms of local pharmaceutical services contracts.

Review of the 2013 Regulations

The Secretary of State must carry out reviews of the Regulations, set out the conclusions of each review in a report; and publish each report.

The first report must be published before the end of 31st August 2017.

Each report must in particular–

(a)     set out the objectives intended to be achieved by the Regulations;

(b)     assess the extent to which those objectives have been achieved;

(c)     assess whether those objectives remain appropriate; and

(d)     if those objectives remain appropriate, assess the extent to which they could be achieved in another way which involves less onerous regulatory provision.

Each subsequent report must be published before the end of the period of five years beginning on the day on which the previous report was published.

Secretary of State Directions

PSNC consolidation of Secretary of State Directions

To help pharmacy contractors, PSNC has produced a consolidation of the above in a single document which should not to be taken as determinative or legally authoritative. It is provided for information purposes only.

Advanced and Enhanced Directions consolidation to December 2016



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